So much beauty out there

October 7, 2006

Korfball terminology

Filed under: All,Korfball — Josh @ 3:12 pm

It is sometimes confusing for a new player to understand the vast array of jargon that has inevitably sprung up within the sport. To ease the learning process for new players, here is a list of some of the terms that you might hear in a korfball match, tournament or training session, and what they mean at the party later on!

Pitch – Pub-that-thinks-it’s-a-nightclub where most gaming begins

Post – Roughly translates as the bar.

Ball – Alcohol. You won’t get into the game much if you can’t get your hands on it, but greedy players tend to look more erratic and desparate as the game goes on.

Pass – Just as in everyday conversation, a pass in korfball means an attempt to pull another player.

Shot – This means the same as “Pass”, beginners often use the same technique for both.

Attacker – Someone on the pull

Defender – Someone unwilling to be pulled

Defended Shot – This occurs where a person prevents a shot from being successful by claiming to already have a partner.

Rebound Defence – When it is impossible to defend a shot, players may instead employ “rebound defence” where they claim to be on the rebound and thus not willing to be pulled. This is a risky tactic and many “attackers” will consider the “rebound defence” to be vulnerable to a good “shot”.

Free Pass – In these circumstances a pass can be attempted with no fear of embarrassing consequences, usually due to drunkenness amongst all the competitors.

Running-in shot – casual encounter which is usually over before the defender has even worked out what’s going on. Very common in student korfball, and most likely of all the shots to result in a “goal”.

Veering-shot – hardest of all, the act of taking a shot from the pavilion end.

Goal – The referee will award this for a shot that scores.

Blam – extreme and harsh rejection of a “shot” in front of all your team-mates, to be avoided at all costs.

Getting the post – Go to the “post” in order to “Collect” alcoholic beverages and distribute to one’s team-mates

Contact – usually happens at the ‘post’ where a player uses untoward physical presence to gain an advantage in collecting. Severely frowned upon

Out-of-hands – knocking over someone’s pint. Free-pint awarded to the opposition.

Travelling – being a bit too obvious about cruising the “pitch” looking for a shooting chance.

Solo-play – Inevitable result of too many failed “passes”. Try to avoid this as the ref will award a free-pass to the opposition and your team-mates will laugh at you.

“Loose” – Commonly used term, when this is called out it means that a defender’s reputation suggests that s/he may be vulnerable to a good “shot”

“Tight” – Here the reverse is true; the defender is likely to “defend” a “shot”. However, the defender may be vulnerable to a “running-in shot”

“Party” – When this is called, it is a sign for all the defenders to have a party – in which they can make “passes” at the attackers.

“Incoming” – Warning shout to your team-mates of the overly hopeful approach of a “traveller”

“Boy Feed/Girl Feed” – While Korfball is usually a most refined game; sometimes a more coarse side emerges, as in these calls, which represent an invitation for oral sex.

4-zero – table of players getting drunk and not taking any shots.

2-2 Formation – This formation was popular in the 60s, when it was known as swinging.

3-1 – That’ll be the gangbang then. Expert teams only

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